The "Zen of the Return" 日本語

IMG_3895-2.jpg

Of all of the marked buoys I had plucked from the beaches of Alaska, this one seemed to be my favorite. I don’t know if it was the style of writing, the meaning it represented, or the way it had been found. I had always hoped to find the owner of it, however way, way back in the corner of my mind, I secretly hoped that the search would be lengthy and difficult. I wanted to hang with it for as long as I could. It was found on Kayak Island, while with my kids, during a portion of one of those trips with them that I have tucked away tightly amongst my fondest memories.

The Kanji painted on the buoy means virtuous or good. It’s Chinese pronounciation (On-Yomi) is “Zen” and it’s Japanese pronounciation (Kun-Yomi) is “Yoi, or Yoshi”. When combined with other Kanji, this particular character could be one of at least two hundred combinations possible to make up a Japanese surname. It may have originated from the Zenzou family, or the Yoshinobu family, for example.

In preparation for my trip to the Tohoku region of Japan this year, I proudly positioned the photo of this buoy before all eighty or so other photos I had in my collection of show and tells. It would be the first buoy that any willing Japanese wakame, or oyster, or scallop farmer would see as they peered into my iPad, searching for something that they might recognize. I wanted it to boldly show how impressive a lot of these markings still looked after traveling over 3000 miles across the Pacific. I also wanted it’s meaning to somehow sink in subliminally. My Japanese was horrible, so I thought that through this picture, I could convey that what I was trying to do there, and what I was about to show, was associated with every good intention.

As we searched and searched for the first three days, no one recognized what I came to call the “Zen” buoy’s origins. I almost began to swipe by it quickly when I started to show the photo collection, because the reality of the slim odds of this mission were starting to sink in. One wakame farmer did recognize the another photo (a "Ki" symbol), however, and gave me great hope. He directed me to a location a few miles away where I just barely caught an oyster farmer dockside before he headed out to sea in his boat.

Untitled99.jpg

As I ran along the dock, towards the boat, photo in hand, I thought I caught something out of the corner of my eye. There were buoys everywhere, of different sizes and shapes, displaying various characters. By that time, I had memorized all of the photos that I carried, and something seemed familiar. I didn’t have the time to investigate what I thought I saw though, so I put it aside in my mind, and continued on my bee-line to the farmer in his boat. As I approached the boat and received permission to board, I saw the sign of the "Ki" on deck.

I was so excited that I had found an owner this way! I showed the photo of the faded character to the owner, but unfortunately, he said that his buoy’s marking was similar, but not the same as the buoy in the photo. It was not his.

IMG_3887.jpg

A tad deflated, I asked if I could show him my other photos and he gladly obliged. He immediately stopped at the first one. “Oh, yes!”, he said, “That must be his.” and pointed just over my shoulder at a man and his wife placing wakame seeds for the season. I couldn’t believe it. There, not twenty feet away was the “Zen” buoy’s brother.

_DSC4278.jpg

Deflated became elated when I approached the nearby wakame farmer! Upon showing him my photo, he said that this was his buoy and that it was his hand that painted his grandfather’s surname upon it. It was used to mark an oyster set, and was lost, along with all of his other buoys, in the tsunami. It took him a while for the gravity of it all to sink in, but once it did, he and his wife rejoiced and were very happy. In the soft and commonly humble Japanese way, they requested that the buoy be returned to them, as a symbol of hope and remembrance of their lives before the disaster.

At that moment, I realized that my days with the “Zen” buoy were coming to an end, but I also realized that I would not have traded the circumstances of that day with any other. I am not a religious guy, but I couldn’t help but sense that there was more to my lucky happenstance. It did not seem to be mere coincidence that this buoy found it’s way home. As I walked away from the dockside and the happy old couple, I truly felt that the exciting, but bittersweet return of the “Zen” buoy was not only an occurrence that was meant to be, but also served a symbol of more “Good or Virtuous” things to come.

IMG_2671_edited.JPG

----------

アラスカの海岸で拾い上げたブイの中でもこのブイが一番お気に入りだった。そこに書かれた文字、それは筆法の一種なのか、どのような意味なのか、またこのブイはどのようにしてアラスカに流れ着いたのか、全く知る由もなかった。持ち主が見つかって欲しいと思っていた。ただ、正直に言うと、すぐには見つかって欲しくないと心のどこかで思っていた。出来るだけ長くこのブイと一緒でいたかったのだ。このブイは、子供たちと出かけた際、カヤック島で発見した。この特別なブイを自分の大切な思い出とともに持ち続けていたかったのだ。

このブイに書かれている漢字は、「良い」あるいは「徳のある」ことを意味している。中国語の読み(音読み)では「ぜん」、日本語の読み(訓読み)では「よい」または「よし」と発音する。少なくとも200以上の組み合わせによって名前の一部となるようだ。たとえば、「善三」(ぜんぞう)や「善信」(よしのぶ)などがある。

今年、日本の東北地方へ旅をする前に持ち主探しのための写真集を準備していたのだが、このブイは80枚ほどある写真の先頭に誇らしく掲載することにした。ワカメ、牡蠣、ホタテなどの養殖を営む人々が自分のiPadを閲覧する際、この写真を最初に目にすることになるからだ。数々の漂流物が太平洋上に浮かびながら7,000kmもの距離を旅し、アラスカに到達した。そして、それらが今もなお堂々とその姿を保ち続けていることに気付いてもらいたかったのだ。また同時に、見る人々の無意識にその意味するところを植え付けたいという想いもあった。自分の日本語はまだ拙い。だから、この写真によって、自分の行おうとしていることがその文字「善」の示す通り善意に基づくものであることを示したかったのだ。

3日間探し続けたが、持ち主は見つからなかった。持ち主を発見することの困難さを身にしみて感じつつあった。そのため、写真集の最初のページにあるこの写真は、パッと見せるだけで次ページに進むようになりつつあった。ところが、あるところで出会ったワカメ養殖業者は、「善」ブイ以外の漂着物を知っているかのようであった。希望が見えてきたのだ。彼は、3~5km離れた波止場を指し示してくれた。そこに辿り着き、私は一人の漁師が船で海に出るにかろうじて話しかけることができた。

写真を片手に、波止場を漁船に向かって走る中、何か色々な形や大きさの様々な文字が書かれたブイを見た気がした。その時までに、持参していた写真は全部記憶していたし、見た中に似たものがあったような気がしたが、時間がないと思いそれはそれとして乗船したばかりの漁師のところに直行した。船に近づき乗船することを許可してもらったところで、私は黒いブイの「いとこ」(少し似ているブイ)を船上で発見した。このような形で持ち主を発見したのだと思い、色めきだった。ところが、そのかすれた文字が描かれたブイの写真を見せたところ、そのマークは似かよっているが自分のものではないと言われた。

私は少しくじけそうになったが、彼に別の写真を見せてもよいか確認したところ快諾してくれた。

何と彼は、最初の写真、「善」ブイを見るや、「そうだ。これは、彼のものに違いない」と言ったのだ。そして、彼は私の肩越しにワカメの種を植え付けようとしていた夫婦を指差した。信じられなかった。600メートルも離れていないところに「善」ブイの「兄弟」(同じようなブイ)があったのだ。

くじける間も無く即座に勇気づけられ、そのワカメ養殖業者に近づいた。写真を見せるや否や、彼はそれが自分のブイであり自分の手によって祖父の名前の一部をそのブイに書いたことを教えてくれた。それは、養殖牡蠣の設置に対する目印であり、他のブイとともに津波によって流されていたのだ。事態を飲み込むまでにほんの少し時間がかかったようであったが、これが何を意味するのか判ったとたん、彼とその妻はたいそう喜んだ。そして、物腰柔らかく、日本人特有の謙虚な態度でこのブイの返還を希望した。これは、彼らの希望の象徴であり震災前の生活の思い出の品であった。

この瞬間、「善」ブイは自分の下を離れてしまうのだということを覚った。が同時に、これ以外に「善」ブイを手放す理由はないこともわかっていた。自分はいわゆる「宗教的な」人間ではない。だが、この幸運な出来事は尋常ではない、何か特別な力が働いていることを感じざるを得なかった。このブイが持ち主の下へ戻ったことはただの偶然ではないと思われた。波止場に佇む嬉しそうな老夫婦のそばから離れ去って行くときに強く感じたことがある。それは、このエキサイティングでどこかほろ苦い「善」ブイの返還が、漂着物を返還したというそれ自体の意義を超えた何かであるということだ。すなわち、それは、これから更に『善い』こと(良いこと、徳のあること)が始まる前触れであり、その象徴に違いないということであった。

Featured Posts
Recent Posts
Search By Tags
No tags yet.